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  • The Inria's Research Teams produce an annual Activity Report presenting their activities and their results of the year. These reports include the team members, the scientific program, the software developed by the team and the new results of the year. The report also describes the grants, contracts and the activities of dissemination and teaching. Finally, the report gives the list of publications of the year.

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Section: Research Program

Numerical analysis

Non-hydrostatic scheme

The main challenge in the study of the non-hydrostatic model is to design a robust and efficient numerical scheme endowed with properties such as: positivity, wet/dry interfaces treatment, consistency. It has to be noticed that even if the non-hydrostatic model looks like an extension of the Saint-Venant system, most of the known techniques used in the hydrostatic case are not efficient as we recover strong difficulties encountered in incompressible fluid mechanics due to the extra pressure term. These difficulties are reinforced by the absence of viscous/dissipative terms.

Space decomposition and adaptive scheme

In the quest for a better balance between accuracy and efficiency, a strategy consists in the adaptation of models. Indeed, the systems of partial differential equations we consider result from a hierarchy of simplifying assumptions. However, some of these hypotheses may turn out to be irrelevant locally. The adaptation of models thus consists in determining areas where a simplified model (e.g. shallow water type) is valid and where it is not. In the latter case, we may go back to the “parent” model (e.g. Euler) in the corresponding area. This implies to know how to handle the coupling between the aforementioned models from both theoretical and numerical points of view. In particular, the numerical treatment of transmission conditions is a key point. It requires the estimation of characteristic values (Riemann invariant) which have to be determined according to the regime (torrential or fluvial).

Asymptotic-Preserving scheme for source terms

The hydrodynamic models comprise advection and sources terms. The conservation of the balance between the source terms, typically viscosity and friction, has a significant impact since the overall flow is generally a perturbation around one equilibrium. The design of numerical schemes able to preserve such balances is a challenge from both theoretical and industrial points of view.The concept of Asymptotic-Preserving (AP) methods is of great interest in order to overcome these issues.

Another difficulty occurs when a term, typically related to the pressure, becomes very large compared to the order of magnitude of the velocity. At this regime, namely the so-called low Froude (shallow water) or low Mach (Euler) regimes, the difference between the speed of the potential waves and the physical velocity makes classical numerical schemes not efficient: firstly because of the error of truncation which is inversely proportional to the small parameters, secondly because of the time step governed by the largest speed of the potential wave. AP methods made a breakthrough in the numerical resolution of asymptotic perturbations of partial-differential equations concerning the first point. The second one can be fixed using partially implicit scheme.

Multi-physics models

Coupling problems also arise within the fluid when it contains pollutants, density variations or biological species. For most situations, the interactions are small enough to use a splitting strategy and the classical numerical scheme for each sub-model, whether it be hydrodynamic or non-hydrodynamic.

The sediment transport raises interesting issues from a numerical aspect. This is an example of coupling between the flow and another phenomenon, namely the deformation of the bottom of the basin that can be carried out either by bed load where the sediment has its own velocity or suspended load in which the particles are mostly driven by the flow. This phenomenon involves different time scales and nonlinear retroactions; hence the need for accurate mechanical models and very robust numerical methods. In collaboration with industrial partners (EDF–LNHE), the team already works on the improvement of numerical methods for existing (mostly empirical) models but our aim is also to propose new (quite) simple models that contain important features and satisfy some basic mechanical requirements. The extension of our 3D models to the transport of weighted particles can also be here of great interest.

Data assimilation

Data assimilation consists in a coupling between a model and observation measurements. Developing robust data assimilation methods for hyperbolic-type conservation laws is a challenging subject. These PDEs indeed show no dissipation effects and the input of additional information in the model equations may introduce errors that propagate and create shocks. We have recently proposed a new approach based on the kinetic description of the conservation law. Hence, data assimilation is carried out at the kinetic level, using a Luenberger observer. Assimilation then resumes to the handling of a BGK type equation. The advantage of this framework is that we deal with a single “linear” equation instead of a nonlinear system and it is easy to recover the macroscopic variables. We are able to prove the convergence of the model towards the data in case of complete observations in space and time.

This work is done in collaboration with the M3DISIM Inria project-team. M. Doumic and B. Perthame (MAMBA) also participate.